An In-Depth Look at the Entourage Effect

January 20, 2019

If you’ve been following our articles lately, then you’ve probably heard the phrase “entourage effect” being used quite often.

Simply put, the entourage effect refers to the way different cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids work together to offer health benefits you can only get when consuming the entire plant in its natural state. For reference, let’s quickly cover what each of these compounds are.

  • Cannabinoids: Naturally occurring compounds, such as THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), CBD (cannabidiol), CBN (cannabinol), etc., that interact with the endocannabinoid system in mammals.
  • Terpenes: A diverse group of organic compounds found in most plants that give them their specific fragrances.
  • Flavonoids: These are important antioxidants that give plants their pigments and attract pollinator animals. In cannabis they’re referred to as cannaflavins.
The entourage effect comes from consuming the whole plant
The entourage effect comes from consuming the whole plant

Cannabis has hundreds of different therapeutic compounds, most of which are stripped out when using products that contain cannabinoid isolates, such as CBD-only products. This isn’t to imply that CBD alone isn’t beneficial, because it certainly is and in specific cases it can be better to treat patients with only one compound. However, there are many instances where a patient could benefit from the synergy of whole plant medicine. The most popular and convenient methods of consuming the whole plant are either smoking or vaporizing, although the latter is notably healthier.

Neurologist Ethan B. Russo, M.D., explains in a detailed study how every single part of the plant matters, from the most dominant cannabinoid to even trace amounts of terpenes. Each compound in the plant has a specific role and they all influence each other’s mechanisms when consumed together.

For example, the terpene myrcene can help diminish resistance in the blood-brain barrier which allows other cannabinoids to access the central nervous system with more ease. Linalool and limonene, two terpenes commonly found in citrus fruits, show promise in managing symptoms of MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) when combined with CBG (cannabigerol). The study covers many more instances of how all these chemicals work together to the patient’s advantage.

Since most cannabinoids and other plant compounds are not very well-known, they seem to get the shaft when it comes to buying flower. Typical cannabis strains you’ll find in dispensaries these days are specifically bred to contain unnaturally high levels of THC. You can also find high-CBD strains but even these are a bit harder to come by. This lack of diversity in chemical profiles means patients are missing out on the entourage effect and the potentially important role all these compounds could play in overall health

Hopefully soon we’ll be able to find strains that incorporate more of these important characteristics and patients will be able to truly feel the effects of whole-plant cannabis medicine.

The post An In-Depth Look at the Entourage Effect appeared first on Cannadelics.





Also in Education

Owning Guns is a Constitutional Right, Unless You’re a Cannabis User

September 28, 2022

Take two of the most hot-button, tendentious issues of our time – cannabis use and gun rights – combine them, and now we really have a debate. As the law currently stands, medical cannabis patients are not afforded their 2nd amendment right to bear arms. Technically, all cannabis consumers are banned from buying guns, but only medical […]

The post Owning Guns is a Constitutional Right, Unless You’re a Cannabis User appeared first on Cannadelics.

Continue Reading

Cannabis policy changes in Africa are welcome. But small producers are the losers

September 28, 2022

TESTSTSARDSAR

Cannabis policy changes in Africa are welcome. But small producers are the losers by Clemence Rusenga

Cannabis is a drug crop with a long history in Africa. Alongside coca and opium poppy, it has been subjected to international control for nearly a century. The International Opium Convention of 1925 institutionalised the international control system and extended the scope of control to cannabis. In 1961 a new international convention was adopted to […]

A link to your site, with your site's name and description as anchor text.

Continue Reading

University of Sydney to Offer Free Cannabis Testing

September 27, 2022

TESTSTSARDSAR

University of Sydney to Offer Free Cannabis Testing by Johnny Green

The University of Sydney is launching a fairly robust study in an attempt to, as the university describes it, “investigate cannabis consumption, behaviours, and attitudes among users.” Part of the study involves offering free, anonymous cannabis testing for people that cultivate their own cannabis in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). Cannabis was decriminalized in 2020 in the […]

A link to your site, with your site's name and description as anchor text.

Continue Reading